Happy Diwali :)

Just popping in to send all of you dear friends a wish for Diwali, may it be bright and shining πŸ™‚

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Keep Calm and Carry On

No food, only joy in Beantown tonight. I am not there, but I am there in spirit. Keep calm and carry on, you little stinkers! (that’s my affectionate nickname for the Red Sox) πŸ™‚

keep calm

poignant win

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Weather With You ~ Spicy Brinjal with Shelly Beans

spicy brinjal with shelly beans
spicy brinjal with shelly beans

More lyrics, tonight πŸ™‚

This time it’s an old favorite by Crowded House.

Listen here or just read, here πŸ™‚

“Walking ’round the room singing Stormy Weather
At 57 Mount Pleasant Street
Well it’s the same room but everything’s different
You can fight the sleep but not the dream

Things ain’t cooking in my kitchen
Strange affliction wash over me
Julius Ceasar and the Roman Empire
Couldn’t conquer the blue sky

Well there’s a small boat made of china
It’s going nowhere on the mantlepiece
Well do I lie like a lounge room lizard
Or do I sing like a bird released

Everywhere you go
Always take the weather with you…”

— excerpt from Weather With You
(Neil Finn / Tim Finn)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Given that choice, this bird will sing, thank you πŸ™‚

If only Nupur had time for another series; let’s say: The A-Z of Weather and Veggies!

I am prepared with “S is for Snow and Spicy Brinjal with Shelly Beans” πŸ˜‰

wall 'o beans oct 4
wall ‘o beans ~ beginning of october

wall o'beans oct 23
wall o’beans ~ this morning

A heavy, wet snow fell overnight and the sun rose feebly over a winter wonderland complete with frosted trees and garden. Sadly, the weight of the snow was such that the sweet old apple tree out front was nearly toppled. Time will tell whether it recovers.

apple tree snowed under
the poor apple tree ~ nearly touching the ground

With snow covering the plants, and more lurking on the horizon, we hurried to finish harvesting the last of the garden. A few days ago we got in the last of the tomatoes and brinjals, a lot of peppers and a few other goodies. It had been unusually warm so we let the garden grow…

late harvest in northern michigan
late harvest in the north woods ~ few days ago

Today, in the fickle in-and-out sunshine of late afternoon, we picked all of the shelly beans and *another* big mess of papdi beans. I have no doubt these papdi would keep growing and growing. They are flowering yet. Perhaps next year I will plant them where they don’t have to be taken down with the fence! πŸ˜‰

fresh papdi beans ~ variety priya
latest, greatest, and probably last mess of papdi beans ~ these will be prepared simply so DG can get a taste of them πŸ™‚

OK, but what on earth are shelly beans? Good question!

Shelly beans are described nicely here in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and also here at BBB Seeds.

I have grown them in the past, but I didn’t know them as shelly beans. I knew them as horticultural or cranberry beans, and cooked them in succotash only.

Mom sent a few seeds of those cranberry beans for the Michigan garden. Planted in July alongside the Priya papdi beans and the long beans (of mixed variety), they flourished as did the others. When I mentioned the pods were turning cream-and-red, Mom told me to hurry and pick them for shellies.

Shellies. Who knew? I think we picked nearly two quarts of them today.

It may be a little late for them in stores or farm markets. It’s certainly late for them here.

shelly beans in the pod
shelly beans in the pod ~ greener pods yield plain beans, while the ripe cream-colored pod yields speckled beans

After learning about them, I knew what I had to do. I shelled those lovely beans. And then…

I thought of my great kitchen buddy, ISG — and how she always pairs brinjal with beans to such great effect. I know a good dish when I taste one; after years of tasting ISG’s recipes, I had no hesitation. Shamelessly taking my cue from her, (and mostly from her recipe), I dove under the bed to dig through my stash of spices. Armed with fresh coriander seeds (is that an oxymoron??), I headed for the kitchen.

Thus was born…

Spicy Brinjal with Shelly Beans

for the curry

a mess of brinjals (I had about 20 in all, small and medium)
one large red onion, diced, divided
4-5 medium fresh tomatoes, pureed (about 2 cups)
1 c shelly beans, shelled and boiled 30 min in salted water, drained
thick tamarind water from a large piece (about 1/2 cup)
jaggery to taste
salt to taste

for the paste

dry roast:
1/4 c coriander seeds
2 TB cumin seeds
a few methi seeds
a few curry leaves
3-4 red chiles, seeded (I used fresh from the garden chiles!)

Saute half the diced onion until lightly browned, then grind with the above to a paste.
Set aside.

for the seasoning

1-2 TB canola oil
curry leaves
1 tsp urad dal
1 tsp mustard seeds
pinch of hing
half the diced onion

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

To prepare:

In a large pan, heat oil over medium heat. When the oil is ready, add urad dal, curry leaves, hing, and mustard seeds. When the seasonings are hot, add half the onion and saute for a few minutes while you prepare the brinjals.*

Add brinjals and saute over med heat until they begin to brown and wilt. Clear a space in the center and add the ground paste. Cook this over medium heat, stirring, until the paste is fragrant. Keep stirring to coat the brinjals.

After five minutes or so, add tamarind water and pureed tomatoes. Mix well. Bring to a simmer, reduce the heat to low and cook about ten minutes. Now taste and add jaggery depending on the sourness. Add a pinch of salt, cover, and simmer until brinjals are tender.

Uncover, stir in the cooked shelly beans and additional salt to taste.

Serve with hot rice to soak up the spicy gravy, and pass the ghee, please!

spicy brinjal and shelly beans curry
oh so spicy brinjal and shelly beans curry ~ thanks for the great idea, ISG!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Slit long brinjals in four pieces, leaving tops intact. Make four cuts in smaller round brinjals. Cut any large brinjals into pieces to match the size of small brinjals. I even had some really tiny ones which I just slit in half as above. I did this while frying the seasonings, so I did not have to worry about discoloration.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There are now five cats in the house…

lemur and gibby
the golden boys ~ lemur and gibby

pinksdaisy
pinks and daisy

Little 22 yo Squeaker is out in her cozy bed by the furnace…

All the kitties are safe and warm. All is well, and winter is coming…

I love it here πŸ™‚

the kitties are in :)
the kitties are all snug inside

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If You Don’t Like The Weather, Wait a Minute ~ Moving Home Part Five, AKA The End

welcome to michigan!
welcome to (beautiful!) michigan

Back in Moving Home Part Four, we were blown across Ohio by a hot wind.

After a much needed rest, we packed up the trusty Subaru with two kitties in the back and some leftover Tony Packo’s in the cooler, and set out on the last leg of the trip home. The day was blustery and a bit rainy — though some cooler than the 100F temps of the day before, it promised to be a weather-ridden ride.

It mattered not.

Nothing could erase the excitement that accompanied one fact: at the end of the day’s drive lay the end of the journey. Today, come what may, we would be home. This was momentous for me — the long and longingly awaited over-the-rainbow day. I shed a few tears of joy when we crossed the state line into my beloved Michigan.
I even called my folks on the cell phone — I was that excited.
My mom said, “oh, wonderful”! Then my dad told me to hang up because it’s not safe to drive while on the phone!

I love my parents πŸ™‚

Of course we stopped at the first rest area so I could get the last requisite welcome sign pic.

me in many layers... welcome to michigan!
home at last ~ in many layers of outerwear πŸ˜‰

We headed northwest to the VIP destination of Ann Arbor,
where I could stock up on some fresh curry leaves, yogurt, and other goodies at Patel Bros. Proximity to my old-haunt Indian groceries is one sacrifice I made in order to live amongst the wild things in the north woods, and I don’t regret it (as a matter of fact, I got my sister to mail me some fresh curry leaves in the heat of summer and they came through just fine!). Still, it was fun to see what will be available to me here, within a few hours’ drive. Patel Bros. is an orderly, modern store with great variety.

Somehow I prefer the smaller mom-and-pop places, so I think our ethnic shopping trips will be made to (closer) Grand Rapids.

Armed with the necessities, we departed populous “downstate” for the relative wilderness of the northern lower.

I took no photos en route. I had been here so many times before. What I had not encountered in my previous travels was a snow-squall near Clare. We drove straight into that snow squall, then straight back out again, in the space of ten minutes or less. It was like driving through a curtain, literally. I will never forget that.

The weather here is so dramatic. No wonder I feel at home πŸ˜‰

At the end of that relatively short drive, I left DG at the airport to pick up his car. He had parked there when he flew to NH, to drive back with me. He was anxious to hurry along and check on his own three kitties: Lemur, Squeaker and Gib. They had been home alone for nearly a week. Pinks, Daisy and I landed at the little cottage I had rented for a month, hoping I would find a place of my own before summer. It was a cute place.

temp rental
the cottage south of traverse city ~ kitties’ and my first home in michigan

The very next day, it snowed!

if you don't like the weather, wait a minute...
if you don’t like the weather, wait a minute…

It’s six months to the day that we landed back home.

Looking back, I wouldn’t change a thing.

kitties at the hometel jan of 13
kitties at the hometel ~ january 2013

kitties in nh feb 2013
kitties at dear S’s place in nh ~ february 2013

kitties in first michigan home
kitties in their first michigan home ~ april 2013

kitties with new brother and sister :)
pinks and daisy with their new brother and sister, gib and squeaker ~ in the kitchen looking to eat ~ october 2013

Welcome home, kitties! πŸ™‚

P.S. How ’bout those sox!

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Season of Change ~ Time Heals, As Do Fritters :)

autumn in northern michigan
stormy sky in autumn ~ my favorite!

Wow, this post has taken a long time to write. It’s cathartic and contains some things I needed to set out on paper — even virtual paper — in order to work through them.

Thanks for your indulgence!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I have always been glad to live in a place where I can experience four seasons. Without winter, I don’t think I would appreciate spring. I’ve always especially loved autumn. In my old life, I looked forward to this season of change; trees adorned in flaming colors against dark and stormy skies and that brisk feeling in the air lending new energy to my walk and to my outlook on life.

Then last autumn came crashing in.

old house being packed up
living room of the old house ~ almost through packing

It’s just over a year since the Massachusetts house was sold.

It had to be sold and I was glad, but… it resulted in a period of panic and mayhem which gave way to a period of anger and frustration, all due to circumstances beyond my control.

Memories of that time are bitter, and I hate that.
I don’t like to be bitter. That’s not *me*!

Since April I have been racing from that old life headfirst into the new. I’ve been frantic.

Frantic is not good. It’s time to stop and remember. It’s time to assimilate all that happened. It’s ok to have a good cry over what should have been. It’s time to heal.

Therefore, I am doing my best to allow myself to feel every emotion I pushed deep down inside last year. If I can do that, I can continue to forge ahead into my new life with my customary enthusiasm.

My new life is a bright one and happy, but sometimes it’s hard to be cheerful *every day*.

It’s tough to be away from my kids. Though they are grown to adulthood I am forever bound to them. There are moments when I am a bit lonesome for the m’n ms.

I can’t always predict or control when those moments occur.
They sneak up and ambush me. I’ve had a good meltdown or two, lately πŸ˜‰
That’s ok; it’s not my fault.

It’s natural.

who would not miss these kids  :)
the best kids in the world ~ nope, I am not biased πŸ™‚

In my new life, I strive to make each day positive and peaceful after the uncertainty and upheaval of the past few years. Sometimes I succeed, other times I am still struggling.

I take comfort in believing that I made the best choices I could during a trying time — I did what I thought was best for both the kids and myself. It’s been a rough couple of weeks, but this too shall pass. Time is a great healer.

So is love.

chickadee at feeder
autumn view at my new home ~ bird pond and chickadee at the feeder

There is a lot to be said for a small gesture made by one, which means so much to another. The old adage is true — sometimes actions speak louder than words πŸ™‚

When the corn had been eaten (mostly by raccoons) and the plants began to fall over, I mentioned to DG that a corn shock would be the perfect autumn decoration. At that time, he didn’t really go for the idea — perhaps it was too festive πŸ˜‰

Several days ago, a corn shock was waiting when I returned from work. Dear G made it for me. That small gesture, as well many larger ones have spoken volumes.

I am snug under a new roof, with a new room at the back of the house besides. The garage has been cleared so that my car fits in, and that enormous supply of wood mentioned in a previous post, cut and stacked by hand, is at the front door. All this is done in anticipation of the cold and snowy winter to come, and it is all very much appreciated by me.

awesome wood pile and corn shock made by dg  :)
the corn shock that DG made for me, leaning on the huge wood pile he made for winter warmth… yep, I am happy πŸ™‚

Did I mention I have a little pumpkin and scarecrow near the front step, and the maize is hanging on the front door as I have always had (and probably he has never had) — making the new home more home-like for me.

So, to you Dearest G — thank you for your constant winter preparation, as well as festive fall decorations.

Thank you for your love; spoken and unspoken alike.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Meanwhile, back in the kitchen…

I made some garden fritters a la Mandira!

I did make changes to the veggies. Mandira’s recipe called for besan, we had just picked green peppers, and I love green peppers and besan combo! I boiled the corn and cut it off the cob, and I added jalepenos. I roasted all the veggies in a non-stick pan with a spritz of oil. I tried two versions — with and without egg. The egg version came out something like a pajeon!

Both were great with maggi sauce πŸ™‚

Garden Fritters a la Mandira
see original recipe here

For veggies:

2 c corn kernels (2 small ears, cut from the cob after boiling)
1 c green bell pepper, seeded and diced (1 large pepper)
2-3 jalepeno peppers, seeded and diced
1/2 c onion, diced

For batter:

1/2 c besan
1/4 c rice flour
1 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp chaat masala
salt to taste
ground pepper to taste

water to make a thick batter
canola oil (or Pam) for spritzing
canola oil for shallow frying

optional: one egg

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Heat a nonstick pan over med-high heat and spritz with canola oil or Pam. Add diced veggies and let them roast for 5-10 minutes — it depends somewhat on the heat of your burners. We don’t want to burn the veggies, only roast them golden with a few dark spots. Flip and toss them from time to time, until they smell and look roasted. Remove to a plate and allow to cool for a few minutes.

pan-roasted veggies
pan-roasted: corn, bell pepper, onion and jalepenos

Meantime, mix the besan and rice flour along with the seasonings in a large bowl.

When the pan-roasted veggies have cooled, add them to the bowl of seasoned flours. Mix well and add sufficient water to form a thick batter. I used approx. 1/2 c plus a couple teaspoons.

thick batter for fritters
a thick batter for fritters ~ optional egg added after frying the first batch πŸ™‚

Heat canola oil in a non-stick pan over med-high. When it’s hot, make the fritters by dropping spoonfuls in, flattening them as you go. Cook until golden and then turn to fry the other side — approx. 5 min per side but your mileage may vary depending on your burner.

Remove fritters and drain on paper towels to absorb excess oil.

Serve hot with Maggi (dg’s favorite) or your favorite chutney/condiment.

*Optional: mix one beaten egg with the batter and cook in the same manner. These will be softer inside and more like a Korean panjeon. The jury is still out on which was tastier πŸ™‚

garden fritters a la mandira
garden fritters a la Mandira! classic on the left and more korean/pajeon style on the right

autumn in the north woods
view from the mailbox is some changed from May ~ still a very happy camper!

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The Weather Rock

The weather rock sits outside the front door of the cozy red house. Who needs The Weather Channel?

If the rock is wet, it’s raining.
If the rock is white, it’s snowing.
If the rock is warm, it’s sunny…

weather rock welcoming autumn

the weather rock, dressed up for autumn in the north woods ~ where it is unseasonably warm (and raining)

Please go and visit my dear friend Shammi, who posted a perfect autumn recipe complete with turnips, mushrooms, and everyone’s favorite, pasta! Shammi, I love you for that post πŸ™‚ As miss m would say, YAY! πŸ˜‰

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Surti Papdi Lilva Valor!? It’s All Poriyal To Me

beans and green chiles
just picked! beans and green serrano chiles

Surti papdi lilva valor!? I am so confused about these beautiful beans, I don’t know what to call them!

I’ve seen these in the Indian groceries for years and they were usually called papdi — this was on the east coast of US… for some reason I never tried them. Shame on me!

Now that it’s a day trip to the nearest Indian grocery, I’ll have to grow more veggies next summer. With these little guys, I am encouraged to do just that πŸ™‚

A long time ago, I received a bonus packet of beans called Val Papdi, ‘Priya’ variety, in an order from Seeds Of India.

For some reason I never planted them. They moved with me to the north woods, where I doubted they would grow at all. As much as I love it here, the growing season can be much shorter than what I was used to — also, the seeds were old.

In spite of rather late planting and much company between dg’s pole beans and my mom’s cranberry beans — they have not only grown, but flourished!

wall o'beans
wide view of the ‘wall o’beans’ in august

cranberry bean from mom's seeds
cranberry or horticultural bean ~ seeds courtesy mom ~ they will be cream colored with red or purple streaks if they have time to ripen ~ you can see the streaks beginning to form

Suddenly we had all these lovely ‘Priya papdi’ beans and I didn’t know what to do with them. Over on facebook, Richa wisely suggested undhiyu! OH, that would be perfect, but I have no time at the moment to make muthia and no means of getting it frozen.

When I try my hand at undhiyu for the first time, I want to cook the *real deal* πŸ˜‰

what is my name!? lovely papdi beans growing...
beautiful beans…

So, for a first taste, I looked for something simple that would showcase the flavor of this veggie which is new to me.
I finally settled on this recipe by fellow WordPress blogger Cheryl of Kitchen Kemistry. It was whipped up in no time and made an awesome lunch today. Thanks Cheryl!

harvest of beans
freshly harvested pale green beans ~ I love their graceful shape!

thinly sliced papdi? beans
the thinly sliced (papdi?) beans

frying seasoning
frying the simple seasonings

an ice cube for water
adding an ice cube instead of water ~ this impromptu trick worked really well and I will remember it next time I want crisp-tender veggies!

the finished poriyal
about fifteen minutes start to finish ~ fresh and fragrant papdi(??) beans poriyal

Incidentally, the Seeds of India listing above says the entire plant is edible including the leaves. If anyone has experience eating leaves of this plant I would be most interested to hear.

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